Wed08202014

Last updateWed, 19 Nov 2014 8pm

   2014 39.95 HSD w VIDor PH-Banner2-500-x-125

CBHS Support our troops campaign

 

Colonial Beach High School students gather outside the Post Office last Wednesday, loaded up with boxes to mail overseas. The students, headed by the Student Council Association and Tricia Runyan and Gail Tinsley (sponsors), began collecting Items to support our troops abroad. Through AdoptaPlatoon, the students were matched with a platoon deployed to Iraq from Ft. Lee, Va. There are 15 men and 10 women in the platoon. Collections concluded on Dec. 1, and the group was able to prepare 40 boxes of goodies, necessities, and entertainment to ship for the holidays. Shipping costs — $12 per box — have been covered by school board officials, administrators, faculty, staff and students. A special thank you goes out to the Colonial Beach Education Foundation, for contributing to the shipping of the packages.

Girl Scout Daisies visit Colonial Beach police

In the early morning hours of Nov. 19 The Tri-County task force executed search warrants and rounded up nine people suspected of various crimes related to drug activity.
But the same day, around 6 p.m., Captain Bill Seay of the Colonial Beach Police Department was hosting a tour of the station for 10 Girl Scout Daisies.
Captain Seay explained to the group of 5 to 7 year olds that the police are not necessarily always going out here and locking up the bad guys, but that they are community oriented.
“We enjoy this opportunity to interact with you where you come in to learn more about the police department,” Seay told the girls.

Read more: Girl Scout Daisies visit Colonial Beach police

Drug roundup continues through weekend

What started as an early morning raid executing search warrants and rounding up suspected drug dealers on Thursday morning continued through the weekend.
Preston D. Gray, 26, of Colonial Beach was arrested last Saturday in Culpepper on charges related to drug trafficking.
His seizure was not as eventful as the early morning raid of Thursday, Nov. 19 at around 5 a.m., when the Tri-County Task Force comprised of the Virginia State Police, Colonial Beach Police, Westmoreland Sheriffs Department, King George Sheriffs Office, Caroline County Sheriffs Office and NCIS (Navel Criminal Investigative Services) along with the FBI made a significant step forward in ridding the community of drug activities.
Derrick Donnell Jones, Steven Bernard Dudley, Donald Wayne Turner, Marshal C. Wilson, Davon Gaston Himes and Bonnie Henry Smith of Colonial Beach were all arrested and charged with various crimes related to drug activity and trafficking. Arlene Malave of Hague and Aaron Early Holtzolclaw of King George were also arrested for drug charges. Candice Nicole Mills of Colonial Beach was arrested under charges related to child abuse and neglect for allowing drug dealing to occur in the presence of minors.
Child Protective Services and Animal Control were called in to assist with any issues concerning minors or animals that may come up. Rescue personnel were put on standby minutes before the round up, but were given the all-clear shortly after.  
The bust took place in at least 12 different locations simultaneously and more than 40 personnel comprised of swat teams and officers converged on locations throughout Westmoreland County, including Colonial Beach, and one location in King George County.

How it all begins

Citizen complaints or tips from someone arrested put police on notice to possible drug activity. If a pattern is confirmed, then an investigation is started. Investigations like the one that lead up to this week’s round up can take at least six months of preliminary work before a raid can be conducted.
“There are just so many aspects that go into investigating,” Westmoreland County Sherriff C. O. Balderson said. “Officers from the task force are all over the place but 95 percent comes from individuals calling us, which we want because that’s the heart and soul of our department. We don’t have personnel on every corner to see the activity. Intelligence gathering from the community letting us know what they see starts the investigating.”
Balderson added: “It takes a lot of foot work, man hours and a lot of intelligence gathering to make it go smoothly.”
Colonial Beach Police Chief Christopher Hawkins said, “People will mistakenly think that because they see activity of people coming and going in patterns that we see it or that we should see it.”  
Hawkins explained that undercover officers can’t be on every corner all the time, but once a citizen reports the activity then officers can be alerted to the situation and start watching and investigating.
Hawkins said it is frustrating not being able to keep the public informed when a member of the community calls with a complaint of possible drug activity, then three weeks later they call back and want to know why nothing has been done.
“It’s great that they call back because a lot of times we get another piece of the puzzle, but at the same time we can’t divulge information about the investigation,” Hawkins said.
Sometimes the activity is under investigation and sometimes the people are already in custody, yet the police can’t give out information until the “round up” is complete.
“In a lot of situations we can’t tell a citizen that we’re doing something about it, we have to wait and that’s the hardest thing to do because we want to make that citizen happy right then because we know they are upset,” Hawkins said.
Balderson explained that the task force has to have enough evidence to avoid making an arrest that would later result in no charges filed and put a dealer back out on the street.
“It wouldn’t do us any good if we rushed into something, then we couldn’t prove it in court or we have it thrown out,” Balderson said. “We have been very fortunate that all previous arrests have resulted in either a guilty plea or conviction.

Read more: Drug roundup continues through weekend

Images from Hurricane Ida

 

Monroe Bay washes over Monroe Bay Ave at the intersection of Ball Street in Colonial Beach.

 

 

The Boat Ramp on Monroe Bay at Monroe Bay Marina.
 
 

 

 

Water reaches the bottom of Happy Clam restaurant in Colonial Beach. One lower storage/office room did sustain flooding.

Hurricane Ida brings flooding to the Beach

Reporter Bruce Leshan of Channel 9 news and cameraman Greg Guise, in the truck, were in town to cover the impacts of the late season storm.



As Hurricane Ida’s remnants became a nor’easter intensifying off the coast of Virginia, the new moon added to a higher than normal high tide in Colonial Beach last night. Mayor Fred Rummage declared a state of emergency in Colonial Beach at the Town Council meeting yesterday evening.
Given the damage done in recent years, Colonial Beach was bound to make news.
A Chanel 9 News crew was on hand yesterday evening just after 6 p.m. for a live shot of the Potomac as it pounded the gazebo on the municipal pier. Reporter Bruce Leshan braved the wind and rain to show viewers how we compared to Ocean City, Md. Although our winds were roughly half the speed of Ocean City’s, our 25 mph winds will surely bring a significant change in the boardwalk if they continue to intensify.  
At high tide, just around 10:30 p.m. last night, boats on trailers in the parking lot of the Yacht Club Marina were submerged in water. Water was washing onto Monroe Bay Ave at Ball Street and on Irving Avenue just past the Wakefield Motel toward the Point, and waves were splashing over the parking lot of St. Johns Condominiums at 715 Washington Ave.
The storm is expected to hang around through Saturday.

Linda Farneth

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