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Antiques Considered - March 16, 2011

As a general rule I do not use this space to describe reproductions, but this week I am making an exception.  A couple in Northumberland County special-ordered this piece to be made by Reese’s Antiques in Richmond back in the 1950s to meet the dimensions of the dining room in their 1874 home overlooking the water.  It is mahogany, and meets the traditional lines one should expect of an 1800-era piece.

This sideboard has value here in Virginia far beyond that of the average reproduction.  Reese’s Antiques on Main

Read more: Antiques Considered - March 16, 2011

Antiques Considered - March 9, 2011

 

This elegant Victorian settee belongs to a collector in Tidewater.  He purchased it at an antique shop, and had it upholstered’ following the pattern of earlier coverings in a fine ecru damask.  The wood frame is walnut, and still has the original finish.

The loveseat dates from the middle of the nineteenth century, and is probably from a cabinet shop in the Mid-Atlantic region.  I would date it at 1850.  The ornate carving and elaborate design indicate a high level of

Read more: Antiques Considered - March 9, 2011

Antiques Considered - March 2, 2011

 

A recent inquiry via e-mail concerns this neo-classical bench that the owner purchased in an antique shop many years ago.  It is mahogany and has paw feet rising to winged phoenix-style capitals.  The gold velvet upholstery is not original, but the finish of the mahogany frame is, retaining the patina of its age.

The bench is a fine example of the neo-classical revival that began in the eighteenth century and received new emphasis after Napoleon Bonaparte's conquest of Egypt in the beginning of the nineteenth century.   Cabinetmakers, initially in Europe, and later in the United States, began producing furniture that they thought replicated that of ancient times.

That phase abated with the coming of the more elaborate Victorian Era that took its inspiration from the Middle Ages, particularly the Gothic period, but the neo-classical returned in the 1870s and 1880s, this time lasting down into the early twentieth century.  This bench is a product of that era.  The Aesthetic Movement of the 1870s was the bridge between the Victorian and the revived Neo-classical.  In the twentieth century much of the rejuvenated interest in neo-classical furniture derived from Jacqueline Kennedy's emphasis on bringing original pieces of it back to The White House.

Neo-classical furniture of all periods remains quite popular, and commands good figures on the auction market.  Although the first period pieces bring far more, those from this second phase, or revival, are not without their own following.  This piece is worth $450.  If it were from the stage of the early nineteenth century the figure would be many times that amount.

As to the gold velvet not being original, I suggest leaving it alone, but if the owner wishes to bring the fabric more into conformity with the style of the frame, I suggest using a striped pattern more in keeping with what would have been original to the piece.

A final word, in the photograph to the side of the bench is what appears to be the base of a fine late Victorian piano lamp, which probably would deserve an "Antiques Considered" in its own right.
Happy Antiquing!

Antiques Considered - February 23, 2011

 A gentleman from North Carolina purchased this Satsuma vase at an antique shop many years ago.  It is brilliant green, with a great amount of highlighted gold leaf decoration, and shows a different motif on each side.  On the one shown the design is floral, on the other overall geometric.  The base bears no marking as to country of origin or manufacturer’s name.  The piece is in perfect condition.
The absence of a country designation means that the piece dates from before 1890; from the design I should put on it a date of 1880. 

Read more: Antiques Considered - February 23, 2011

Antiques Considered - February 16, 2011

A gentleman from Alabama, who now lives in the Northern Neck, bought this small pottery vase at an antique shop in Guntersville, Alabama for $3.00 nearly forty years ago.  The flowers are hand-painted with no stenciling, but the vase bears no maker’s mark.  It has no cracks or crazing, and the owner says he bought it because he liked its bright yellow color.  The flower painting on the front side is more extensive than on the rear.  The bases of the four feet are unglazed.
 From the description a couple of conclusions are readily apparent. 

Read more: Antiques Considered - February 16, 2011

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