Thu04242014

Last updateTue, 04 Nov 2014 9pm

    2Q14-MetroCast VIP-HBO 500x125

Antiques Considered - May 5, 2010

A writer from Northumberland County asks about her Fenton carnival glass hexagonal dish, which she acquired at an estate sale.  It is deep purplish blue with a flower motif in the center and surrounding the edge, and is in perfect condition.  It bears the raised mark, “Fenton” on the bottom.
Fenton is the oldest continuously manufactured glass in America.  The company began in Ohio in 1905, and produced its first pieces in 1907.  Its longevity and success have resulted from its ability to produce a very wide range of products, in short, something for everyone. That tradition continues today, and all major antiques and collectibles price guides cover Fenton in detail.
Carnival glass became popular in the early twentieth century, when pieces often were prizes at carnivals, thus the colloquial name. Because of the company’s long tenure during which it manufactured the ever-popular pieces, dating individual items is difficult without seeing them in person.   By examining the amount of wear on the bottom one can get a better picture than merely by seeing a photograph.
That much said, this piece appears to date since 1970, the year the company began using a trademark in the form of an embossed oval with “Fenton” inscripted in the center.  The hexagonal shape is particularly popular, as is the purplish blue coloring.  

Read more: Antiques Considered - May 5, 2010

Antiques Considered - April 28, 2010

This worktable comes from an e-mail from Middlesex County.  It is a mixed wood two-drawer table that has been refinished. Apparently, it had deteriorated badly, and was brought back to its present condition many years ago.
The table is of Sheraton design, and dates from the 1830s.  The turning on the legs is particularly fine.  The primary woods are cherry and maple, the drawer fronts being the latter.  The top demonstrates the extent to which it underwent refinishing.
The secondary wood is poplar, and the white porcelain knobs are not original.  The original ones were either brass or glass.  I advise replacing them accordingly as a way of restoring the piece to its maker’s design.

Read more: Antiques Considered - April 28, 2010

Antiques Considered - April 21, 2010

Three weeks ago a former student of mine at The University of Alabama in Huntsville came to a meeting at Langley Air Force Base in Hampton.  I had not seen him in almost a quarter of a century when we met for lunch during his visit.  Among other things he told me about a piece of furniture he and his wife had bought for $600 about 20 years ago.  I suggested that he sent me a photograph of it and I would try to write about it for this column.
    It is a fine High Victorian dresser or bureau that was made between 1880 and 1895.  It has the original cast brass hardware and marble top, and is in excellent condition.  The wood appears to be walnut, still with its original finish, and the secondary wood is most likely poplar.  From e-mail I judge the mirror to be original.  The marquetry and veneering are quite good, and the serpentine front demonstrates a high level of sophistication during the design phase in n the factory or cabinet shop that produced it.

Read more: Antiques Considered - April 21, 2010

Antiques Considered - April 14, 2010

London, England, U.K. This week our family is spending spring break from school here in Merrie Olde England. We have been visiting friends, doing the usual tourist activities, i.e., the British Museum, Westminster Abbey, Westminster Cathedral, Saint Paul’s Cathedral, Canterbury, the White Cliffs of Dover, Stonehenge, Bath, and Windsor, where we stopped for Prince Philip to pass in front of us driving his wagon with four ponies down the Long Walk.
I had seen these places many times previously, and my wife and I wanted our two teenagers to experience them as well. New to me on this trip were visits to the Cabinet War Rooms where Winston Churchill led the British effort against the Nazis for five years, and Sir John Soane’s Museum. The latter is the subject of this column.

Read more: Antiques Considered - April 14, 2010

Antiques Considered - April 7, 2010

An e-mail writer has sent this picture of a Jacobean-style chair she recently acquired. The upholstery is new, and the condition is good. The writer does not mention the type of wood, but I assume it is walnut. She was told that it is Jacobean, but asks if it could be Jacobean Revival from the 19th century.
Indeed, this piece is the latter, a 19th-century version of a style that was popular in the Tudor and Stuart reigns in England. It dates from the 1840s, and exhibits Jacobean arms and legs, with the back panel being a fine example of the folded linen style popular in Tudor times, particularly during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I.

Read more: Antiques Considered - April 7, 2010

201404chamberlink

 

201404source

 

201401kgpr

Contact Us

The Journal Press, Inc. P. O. Box 409, 10250 Kings Hwy. King George, VA 22485

EditorialAdvertisingOffice
Ruth Herrink, Publisher
540-469-4144
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Carla Gutridge
540-709-7061
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Leonard Banks, Production
540-469-4196
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Leonard Banks, Sports editor
540-469-4196
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Steve Detwiler
540-709-7288
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Drue Murray
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Phyllis Cook
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Charlene Franks
540-709-7075
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Cindy Ailey
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Linda Farneth,
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Elizabeth Foreman,
540-709-7076
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Charlene Franks, Accounts
540-709-7075
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Richard Leggitt
540-993-7460
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Lori Deem
540-709-7495
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Bonnie Gouvisis
540-775-2024
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Lori Deem, Community Events
540-709-7495
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Advertising Information
540-775-2024
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Jessica Herrink
540-469-4031
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Journal Print Shop

Contact Steve Detwiler

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

540-709-7288 • 540-775-2024

Quikey

Bulletline

Holiday Cards and Cards for all Occasions

Balloon House