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Saving the Postal Service

At the time of the American Revolution it was difficult to mail a letter to someone in another colony. You could do it, there were couriers, but there was no such thing as a uniform rate, a stamp, or even regular delivery. That’s why in the earliest days of the Republic there was an appreciation for the need to find ways to bind these disparate colonies together. That’s where the Post Office came in. They would carry letters and packages to anywhere in the new nation. And they still do. But, in those early years, when the roads were bad and travel hard the image that carried on for over two centuries was born. “Neither snow, nor rain, nor dark of night, shall deter this courier from his appointed route.”

The U.S. Mail for many of us of a certain age is an icon. Thirty-five years ago I waited on my acceptance letters for college. A few years later, I waited, watching with an ever pounding heart for the mailman, to see if the Navy had accepted me for its direct commissioning program. And, when I was overseas, and this was in the days before inexpensive international telecommunications, I wrote and received letters. I remember how special it was to get a letter from home and how I developed a little ritual around the process. I didn’t rip open the second it was handed to me.   I held onto it for awhile.  And later, in some quiet place, still admiring the American airmail stamps, particularly if they had a flag on them, I opened and read the letter.  
The U.S. Post Office, since 1971, known as the Postal Service, is an almost universal presence in our country. There are, by my best count, five Post Offices in King George County and four in Westmoreland County.  But there is also, much further a field, a Post Office in Bethel, Alaska (located in the middle of hundreds of thousands of acres of magnificent permafrost) and another in the high desert of Apache Wells, New Mexico.  Both of these, to put it mildly, are in out of the way locations.  Indeed, there are thousands of Post Offices, of all kinds, all over the United States.

However, the Postal Service in the 21st century, which, I like to point out to anyone who will listen, is still the “only unsubsidized mail carrier” in the world, is in trouble.  But, it’s not as bad as some would have you believe.  It is fixable.  First, there is the reality that it’s got a deficit.  $10 Billion is the frequently cited number.  That’s bad.  However, $5.1 Billion of this is a based on a dubious bit of creative accounting which requires the Postal Service to make pre-payments, to the tune of $5.1 Billion each year, into the Federal Retirement System. No other government agency or government corporation has to do this.  Further, the rationale for making the prepayments has never made sense.   

That, of course, is some comfort, but the Post Office, even making that adjustment, is still $5 Billion in the red.  If they’re to turn the corner, and start edging back out of this steady decline, their costs and overhead need to be trimmed.  This means a lot of small Post Offices, and sadly, this includes the Post Office at Dogue, which is on the watch list, may have to go.  Stafford recently lost its Brooke Post Office which had been open for most of the last century.  Saturday mail will also have to end.  It doesn’t make any sense anymore.  Congress, while anxious to bash the Postal Service at every turn, has, almost irrationally, put a hold on both of these cost cutting actions. That doesn’t help. And finally, while the Postal Service still carries over 168 billion items each year (and of note, commercial services, actually grew 4%), it still has to find ways to do its job much more cheaply. And they can’t afford to wait.  This means cutting alot of staff, now, automating and streamlining more services, and making pay and benefit agreements with the Postal Service Unions that are more in line with the ability of the Postal Service to cover them.

Also, the Postal Service needs to continue to leverage its collaboration with private carriers.  Very few people realize that the Post Office, on its own, before it became fashionable, had developed a number of vigorous and successful private sector partnerships.  This kind of collaboration needs to continue to grow. 

However, at the end of the day, this entire drama, while it may appear to be taking place in Washington, is actually happening at my mailbox and the mailboxes of millions of other Americans.  My mailman, in 22 years, has missed a delivery only three times – once in a blizzard (how he managed to carry the mail, successfully, during days I couldn’t get out of the driveway, I still haven’t figured out), and two days, during Hurricane Isabell.  After any big storm, whenever I see his familiar jeep, I know the worst was over.  That’s why, in my mind, it’s far too early to write an obituary for the Postal Service.  The service it provides, to everyone, no matter where you live, is still part of the glue that holds the nation together.  It’s not an anachronism and I still check the box every morning, waiting for who knows what overseas letter, bill, or long ordered purchase, just to prove it.  And every once in awhile, someone even sends me a letter.

You may reach David Kerr at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Those remarkable Pilgrims and their journey

Most Americans would be hard pressed to explain why the Pilgrims, to many a strange icon of American history to begin with, are so important in our celebration of Thanksgiving. Most of us learned their story in elementary school. We were taught that they were Puritans who fled England in search of religious freedom. On the way to the new world their ship went off course, ended up in cold, distant New England, then a wilderness, and had to make do on their own.

They had little to eat, were ravaged by disease, many died, but through their own tenacity, and the help they received from the Native Americans, things got better. And that became the basis of that wonderful image of the “First Thanksgiving,” when the settlers and the Indians, ate together. It’s an enduring legend.

Read more: Those remarkable Pilgrims and their journey

Trying to understand the Occupy Wall Street Movement

The Occupy Wall Street Movement isn’t a headline grabber. They got some initial coverage, but very quickly, coverage of the Occupy movement, rapidly declined. That’s because, simply put, they’re hard to write about. For one thing, while having a range of issues that concern them, they have no agreed-upon agenda. Also, as one participant described their protest, “the movement is purposefully disorganized.” That’s a challenge to anyone who is trying to write a story about them. However, they are, with very few exceptions, peaceful, and if you go to talk to them, as I have in Washington, which, like New York, has been accommodating to the protestors, they’re friendly, good natured, and polite. And make no mistake, they’re serious about their concerns, and what’s more, this is a movement, and a presence in many of our nation’s cities, which months after it began, hasn’t gone away.

Read more: Trying to understand the Occupy Wall Street Movement

A salute to all of America’s Greatest Generations

It was the early 1860s and the United States of America was in the process of tearing itself apart in a great national crisis. But in the midst of that there was a series of small news stories that appeared in newspapers from time to time that captured a common emotion in both the Confederacy and the Union. It was the passing of the very last of America’s original greatest generation, the veterans of the American Revolution.

Make no mistake, by any generation’s standard, these were very old men. They had fought in a war that had ended 80 years before and as they died, no matter where they were from, newspapers in the North and the South dutifully noted their passing.

Read more: A salute to all of America’s Greatest Generations

The Return of Penny the Poodle; life is better

My wife and I recently moved to a new house. It’s got a barn, a little acreage, and room for a couple of horses. It’s a wonderful place and I am slowly learning how to work a tractor and mend fences. But, first we had to move, and we had been in the old house for 22 years. It’s amazing how much “stuff” a family can manage to pack into one modest-sized house. And I am shocked to admit, that when we were packing up, there were even some boxes left over from our move from Reston, over two decades ago, that hadn’t even been opened. They were, in a sense, time capsules. But, I am also a little embarrassed that they had just taken up space for so long, and worst of all that we

Read more: The Return of Penny the Poodle; life is better

STEM - the keys to our nation’s competitiveness

It’s a fair question and it’s one that as a former school board member I feel awkward even asking. And that is, “just what is a modern high school degree worth in the 21st century?” I don’t have an answer for that, but for decades, there has been a growing body of evidence that students leaving high school aren’t ready for the workforce, or for that matter, aren’t even adequately prepared, or ready for their post secondary school education.

This doesn’t seem fair. We put a lot of time and energy into our schools, our kids work hard, and we should be

Read more: STEM - the keys to our nation’s competitiveness

 

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