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Is this year’s governor’s race already over?

 There are still nearly three weeks until the election. The candidates have turned up the volume and are working frantic schedules. Indeed, the campaign has reached that critical stage just before the big push. That’s when most of the money, mostly on TV advertising is going to be spent.

Read more: Is this year’s governor’s race already over?

Our greener future may be just off shore

This is a statistic that will take most people by surprise.  During the past five years, the number of new kilowatt hours added to our national power generation capability through the application of wind technology has dramatically exceeded that of coal.
Really, it’s not surprising.

Read more: Our greener future may be just off shore

The Wilder Factor - Will it make or break the Dems’ chances?

Former Governor Doug Wilder is, to apply an overused term, an original. He is a Democrat. He was elected a state senator, lieutenant governor and governor as a Democrat. And yet, throughout his long and accomplished career, he has often been at odds with his own party. This year he has done it again. The former governor, the first African American elected to the job, has once again bucked the Democratic Party and chosen not to endorse a candidate for governor. What’s more, he did so in a very public way.
Of course, this isn’t the first time Doug Wilder has played this game. In fact, it started as far back as 1982. That year, with the retirement of Harry F. Byrd Jr., a U.S. Senate seat was coming open and Chuck Robb, along with other prominent Democrats, were supporting Delegate Owen Pickett as their candidate. Doug Wilder was incensed. No one knows quite why exactly, but it didn’t matter, then-State Senator Wilder said he would run as an independent if Pickett were the Democratic nominee. That was all it took. Shortly after that Pickett withdrew his candidacy.

 

Read more: The Wilder Factor - Will it make or break the Dems’ chances?

Deeds picks up voters in the polls

Because Virginia is only one of two states in the nation electing their governor this year, it’s not surprising that we’re getting a little national attention.
However, this year this attention will probably be unprecedented. We are in a state that after 44 years of voting for Republicans for president, last year, weighed in with Barack Obama. Both sides, particularly now that the president’s popularity has dimmed a little, are looking at us for validation.
The Republicans desperately want a win in Virginia. If they won the Commonwealth, they could claim that it was a sign that their party was starting a come back.
The Democrats, for their part, have just as much riding on this race. Their prospects in New Jersey, the other state electing a governor this year, don’t look that good and they hope that by winning Virginia, something of a new prize, they could show that they’re holding their ground.

Read more: Deeds picks up voters in the polls

Deeds still can’t find his voice

Virginia, it can be argued, by virtue of having its state elections in off years, diffuses the impact of national politics. This was certainly the case in times past, and as recently as 30 years ago, but in the 21st century, where the buzz of national politics never quite stops it’s not necessarily true anymore. This year’s campaigns for governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general, while by no means national races, are nonetheless profoundly affected by national politics.
This was certainly the case in 2005. That was the year Tim Kaine beat Jerry Kilgore. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and as public frustration with the war in Iraq was growing, the tide of the governor’s race, which had favored the Republicans well into the fall, shifted to Democrat Tim Kaine. GOP fatigue and angst over George Bush gave the Democrat a significant boost. Tim Kaine won handily.
This year, however, is playing out differently. In 2009, it’s Democrat Creigh Deeds who is dealing with the burden of his party being in power in Washington. Of course, sometimes this is an asset. A popular president can always help. But with President Obama generating so much controversy over health care, cap and trade (a big issue in the coal fields), and the deficit, the Obama administration doesn’t offer much in the way of coattails. Virginians, even those who might normally vote Democratic, might, in a statewide election, support a Republican. That’s what Bob McDonnell is hoping will happen.
The McDonnell strategy has been surprisingly simple. He is staying away from the hot button social issues and focusing on the economy, small business, and most importantly, jobs. This is a message that resonates in just about every region of the state. While Virginia’s jobless rate is low by comparison to the rest of the country, it’s still a major source of anxiety. While most people have a job, just about everyone can readily name someone they know who has lost theirs. This, as Harry Truman once quipped, was the classic definition of a recession.

 

Read more: Deeds still can’t find his voice

McDonnell’s thesis is not yet a stumbling point

Every campaign has a stumble. Sometimes they’re game changers and sometimes they’re not. In 2006 George Allen referred to a young man of Indian descent as a “macaca.” As we all found out, that word was not a kind reference. And while this insult seemed like nothing more than a stumble at the time, it quickly took on a life of its own. Many think it was the first step on the road to the senator’s defeat in November. Other stumbles, such President Obama’s association with the inflammatory Reverend Jeremiah Wright can cause a stir, but then quickly fade away.
Creigh Deeds, whose campaign has had serious problems getting started, is hoping that his opponent, Bob McDonnell, might also be having one of those stumbles that won’t go away. What’s happened is that Bob McDonnell’s 1989 master’s thesis from what was then called the Christian Broadcasting Network (CBN) University (it’s now Regency University) has found its way into the press. Most such documents aren’t that exciting. But McDonnell made his into something of a political agenda. It’s called “The Republican Party’s Vision for the Family.” It is well written, coherent and decisive. Hopefully, it got an A. It deserved one. However, a lot of it, particularly for a candidate who has spent the past year trying to define himself as a moderate could put the candidate in an awkward position.

Read more: McDonnell’s thesis is not yet a stumbling point

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