Fri08222014

Last updateWed, 19 Nov 2014 8pm

   2014 39.95 HSD w VIDor PH-Banner2-500-x-125

Is the Stimulus Working?

The recession began during the last quarter of 2007 and the gross domestic product fell by 2.8%. There was a slight rebound during the first quarter of 2008, but during the rest of the year, the direction was all down.  Consumer demand was off and prices declined.  The latter was a sure sign of the rather scary economic phenomena known as deflation.  
And most worrisome, foreclosures and bankruptcies reached levels not seen since the great depression.  Also, to add to the confusion, the banking system, with its faltering mortgage backed securities, seemed on the verge of collapse.  Sometimes, even a few months later, it’s easy to forget how bad things had gotten.  

 

Read more: Is the Stimulus Working?

It’s not just for whittling

Next to my keyboard there is battered old pocketknife that belonged to my grandfather. It’s seen better days. I have no idea of the brand. The little plate that identified its maker is long gone. It’s a simple affair. It had two blades and is in a green case. My granddad died 40 years ago, and I have no idea how old it is. One knife, the shorter of the two, is broken off. No doubt Poppy, as we called my granddad, used it to pry something open and it wasn’t up to the stress. The second is still functional, but it’s been sharpened so many times that its shape has been distorted. I don’t use it, of course. It’s a keepsake, and is a connection to the roots of my own passion for the pocketknife.
Pocketknives, for many, are something of a throwback. A handy tool, that in our progressively urban world, is often associated with farmers, outdoorsman, and, of course, folks who sit on their porch and whittle. Usually, the latter, to some of my city friends, is an image that’s also associated with drinking moonshine and playing the banjo on the front porch. But pocketknives have moved well beyond that. And I have several that prove that point. I have one, that has, let’s see, a saw, three kinds of screw drivers, a cork screw (very important), a can opener, a pair of scissors, tweezers, tooth pick, fish hook remover, and several other tools I haven’t quite figured out yet. It’s handy, but it has one drawback. It’s heavy and in my pocket manages to feel like I am carrying a brick. So, my preference is for something smaller.

Read more: It’s not just for whittling

Journalism great passes, ‘and that’s the way it is’

When Walter Cronkite retired in 1981, in his typical, fatherly, and always gentle manner, he said that his departure wasn’t all that important. He had been preceded by a fine journalist and would be followed by a fine journalist. It was, in his words, “just a passing of the baton.”
At the time he was probably right. Broadcast news was still at its height. CNN had only been on the air for a year and the Internet was still a long way off. The evening news, anchored by names such as Chet Huntley, David Brinkley, and Howard K. Smith, was still one of the principal sources for news and information. And the people who guided us through that half hour wrap-up of world events each evening were trusted visitors to our homes. Walter Cronkite, one of those handful of welcomed TV visitors, died last week at age 92. According to several polls in the 1960s and ’70s, when Cronkite was at the height of his fame, he was considered the most trusted man in America.

Read more: Journalism great passes, ‘and that’s the way it is’

Local governments and the recession: some twists, some turns, some IOUs

During a recession, the Federal Government has one big advantage over everyone else. It can run a deficit and continue to borrow. In a sense, as some like to say, it can just keep printing money. However, other governments, such as states, counties, towns and cities, don’t have this option. Though some can run a deficit for a little while, in the end, they all have to come up with some way to balance the books.
Though revenue for local governments often fluctuates, sometimes dramatically, they rarely find themselves looking at the possibility of default. Usually, through belt tightening, higher taxes and borrowing, they can get through a tough spot. However, this year is putting the soundness of many state and local governments to the test. Some are getting by and others aren’t doing well at all.

Read more: Local governments and the recession: some twists, some turns, some IOUs

Kaine needs to disclose his travel schedule

Tim Kaine is a popular and well-liked governor. He is considered honest, straight forward, and generally willing to tell it like it is. That’s a refreshing trait in any politician, and it has served Kaine well in his nearly four years as governor. However, if Kaine isn’t careful, this reputation, and with it his legacy, could be in trouble.
Most political observers would readily agree that Tim Kaine has always been a political governor. This is in contrast to his predecessor, Mark Warner, who tended to downplay his role as leader of the party. Warner helped the party, raised money and recruited candidates, but he did so quietly. He wasn’t eager to agitate the Republicans any more than he had too. He figured, rightly, that he would need their help down the road, so making a lot of political noise just wasn’t advisable.

Read more: Kaine needs to disclose his travel schedule

Founding Fathers highlighted the odd, interesting and important “pursuit of happiness”

They are just three words, imprecise, to say the least, that close the second paragraph of the Declaration of Independence. This section of the declaration, perhaps the most memorable of the entire document, states «We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” It was remarkable enough for the Founding Fathers to declare the equality of mankind and the sanctity of natural rights, but its closing phrase did something that no government document had ever done, and that’s to state that the pursuit of individual happiness is a right of humankind. 

Read more: Founding Fathers highlighted the odd, interesting and important “pursuit of happiness”

201407chamber

 

201408source

201404getaway

 

201401kgpr

Contact Us

The Journal Press, Inc. P. O. Box 409, 10250 Kings Hwy. King George, VA 22485

EditorialAdvertisingOffice
Jessica Herrink, Publisher

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Carla Gutridge
540-709-7061
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Leonard Banks, Production
540-469-4196
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Leonard Banks, Sports editor
540-469-4196
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Steve Detwiler
540-709-7288
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Drue Murray
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Phyllis Cook
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Charlene Franks
540-709-7075
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Linda Farneth,
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Elizabeth Foreman,
540-709-7076
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Charlene Franks, Accounts
540-709-7075
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Richard Leggitt
540-993-7460
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Bonnie Gouvisis
540-775-2024
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Lori Deem, Church & Community
540-709-7495
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Advertising Information
540-775-2024
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Jessica Herrink
540-469-4031
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Journal Print Shop

Contact Steve Detwiler

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

540-709-7288 • 540-775-2024

Quikey

Bulletline

link4

Your Invitation Place

Balloon House