Tue09022014

Last updateThu, 19 Nov 2015 8pm

   2014 39.95 HSD w VIDor PH-Banner2-500-x-125

Meeting on Fracking next week

An informational meeting from conservationists on the topic of hydraulic fracturing, called fracking, is scheduled on Tuesday, Sept. 24, at 6 p.m. in Fredericksburg at the England Run Branch Library, 806 Lyons Boulevard.


Oil companies did aggressive mineral rights leasing and some core hole drilling in this area beginning in the mid-1980s with more than 250,000 acres leased at the time in King George and Westmoreland, as reported in The Journal this past January.

Download information about the Sept. 24 meeting and find out more information about fracking. Attend the meeting and see how fracking affects you and everyone  in our community.


In April 1992, test drilling was suspended after failing to find oil in commercial quantities on three farms in King George, according to archived news reports from the Baltimore Sun.

An oil company spokesman told the Sun at the time that if the Taylorsville Basin contains hydrocarbons “they probably will be in the form of natural gas instead of oil.”

 

TAYLORSVILLE BASIN
Most of King George and the adjacent area overlays the Taylorsville Basin, an underground fault rift that extends about 100 miles from Richmond north to near Clinton Md. It is about 25 miles wide at its broadest point.

In addition to King George, it overlays large sections of Westmoreland and Caroline, along with parts of Essex and King & Queen in Virginia, as well as sections of Southern Maryland.

FRACKING
In the meantime, new technology, including hydraulic fracturing, has provided the ability for drillers to recover natural gas more economically if it is available in commercial quantities.

Fracking is a process whereby chemicals and water are forced deep into the ground to fracture the shale rock strata to release natural gas. Environmentalists say the process consumes huge amounts of water and that the chemicals used can pollute aquifers.

As The Journal reported in January, during the last year Shore Exploration & Production Corp. secured mineral rights leases for more than 80,000 acres in King George, Westmoreland, Caroline, Essex and King and Queen Counties and was looking to secure more.

It also opened an office in Bowling Green and began working with the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy (VDMME). A Shore Exploration official said earlier this year that the state has strict laws to protect the environment and that the company was working with it to develop a plan.

MEETING
The meeting next Tuesday is sponsored by the Virginia Conservation Network and the Virginia League of Conservation Voters Education Fund to discuss issues related to hydraulic fracturing to provide information about this type of drilling and its potential impacts on communities. The Virginia Conservation Network is a coalition of 150 environmental nonprofits and community groups.

Albert Pollard, former member of the Virginia House of Delegates representing King George and adjacent counties, is helping to spread the word about the upcoming meeting. In an email to a local group, Pollard noted, “There are a lot of gas leases in King George and Westmoreland right now and I think this is a good time to start a community discussion.”

Pollard added, “I don’t think this has to be a ‘Hell No,’ but I do think that it is far better to err on the side of caution in these matters as there are several aspects to hydraulic fracturing for oil in this region that make it a more delicate operation.”

20130918TaylorsvilleBasin Map

press the above image for to download a

detailed map

201407chamber

 

201408source

201404getaway

 

201401kgpr

Contact Us

The Journal Press, Inc. P. O. Box 409, 10250 Kings Hwy. King George, VA 22485

EditorialAdvertisingOffice
Jessica Herrink, Publisher

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Carla Gutridge
540-709-7061
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Leonard Banks, Production
540-469-4196
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Leonard Banks, Sports editor
540-469-4196
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Steve Detwiler
540-709-7288
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Drue Murray
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Phyllis Cook
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Charlene Franks
540-709-7075
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Linda Farneth,
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Elizabeth Foreman,
540-709-7076
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Charlene Franks, Accounts
540-709-7075
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Richard Leggitt
540-993-7460
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Bonnie Gouvisis
540-775-2024
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Lori Deem, Church & Community
540-709-7495
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Advertising Information
540-775-2024
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Jessica Herrink
540-469-4031
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Journal Print Shop

Contact Steve Detwiler

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

540-709-7288 • 540-775-2024

Quikey

Bulletline

link4

Your Invitation Place

Balloon House