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W’md waterman cited for oyster poaching

Virginia Marine Police, determined to protect a resurgent oyster population, are cracking down on watermen who are violating oyster catch restrictions, citing them for poaching ad harvesting oysters illegally.

One of those cited as a part of the two-year crackdown is a Westmoreland waterman — James Calvin

Read more: W’md waterman cited for oyster poaching

Lillian Lou Lucas

Lillian Lou Lucas, 72, of King George County died Friday, March 8, 2013.
She is survived by her husband, Harrison Maurice Lucas; a son, Harrison Maurice Lucas Jr.; six daughters, Christine Thomas, Carolyn Sutton, Linda Lou Peyton, Wilia Mae Jackson, Annette Sutton and Cynthia Lucas.
A funeral will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday, March 16, at Good Hope Baptist Church in King George.
Lee Funeral Home in Warsaw is handling the arrangements.

‘Tebow Bill’ Passes in House, Awaits Action in Senate

Richmond – Home-schooled students in Virginia could participate in public school sports under the so-called “Tebow bill” that has been passed by the House and will be considered by a Senate committee this week.

Delegates voted 56-43 for House Bill 1442, which will be heard by the Senate Health and Education Committee on Thursday, Feb. 14. The bill, sponsored by Del. Robert Bell, R-Albemarle, would require public schools to allow home-schoolers to participate in sports and other extracurricular activities.

Many parents who home-school their children support the legislation, which is nicknamed for NFL quarterback Tim Tebow, who played football for his local high school while being home-schooled in Florida.

“I should be able to choose whether my kids play sports or not,” said Brad Foster, the father of five athletic home-schooled boys in Culpeper.

Currently in Virginia, no student who is being educated at home can join a public school sports team during the regular season. Families with home-schooled athletes like Foster’s must find other ways to participate in sports or opt out of playing sports completely.

Foster said the opportunity for his children to play sports goes away once they reached middle school. To allow his children to play sports, Foster has organized a basketball team. However, that’s expensive because home-schooling families must rent gym space whereas public schools provide everything for sports teams, Foster said.

“We want to use the privilege because we also pay taxes for [public schools] as well,” Foster said. Parents who home-school their children are not exempt from taxes.

Virginia has more than 32,000 home-schoolers, including about 8,000 at the high school level, according to the Virginia Department of Education. Albemarle County, for example, has more than 500 home-schoolers.

The Keyser family in Albemarle County also has struggled with the problem. Ethan Keyser, 17, is a junior in high school and likes to play football and lacrosse.

“I would like the opportunity to try out on a high school athletic team,” Ethan said.

Until high school, he played both sports because of various recreation teams, according to his father, Matt Keyser. Now that Ethan is in high school, he cannot play either sport except during off-season.

During off-season, Ethan was asked to play for several traveling high-school lacrosse teams, Matt Keyser said.

“He’s 6-foot-one, 210 pounds, and every coach he has ever played said they wished Ethan could play during the regular season,” Keyser said.

Ethan is now looking to apply for college. “It would’ve looked good on my college transcripts to have that I played several high school sports,” he said.

When the House voted on HB 1442 on Jan. 31, Republicans generally supported the legislation and Democrats mostly opposed it.

Del. David Toscano, D-Charlottesville, and Del. Jennifer McClellan, D-Richmond, for instance, both voted against bill.

“The public school system is not an a la carte menu that you can pick and choose what you want to participate in,” McClellan said. She said the “Tebow bill” raises a “matter of fairness.”

Toscano agreed.

“One worry is that you would have a situation where a youngster in a public school was denied to participate because a home-schooler took their spot,” he said.

After passing the House, HB 1442 was referred to the Senate Committee on Education and Health. The committee’s next meeting is at 8:30 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 14 in Senate Room B in the General Assembly Building. If the committee approves the bill, it will go to the full Senate for a vote.

An identical measure, Senate Bill 812, had been filed in the Senate in December by Sen. Thomas Garrett, R-Hadensville. But Garrett withdrew his proposal on Jan. 31.

 

 

Paige Baxter, Capital News Service

 

Veterans & Quilts

Allen Ingraham, Clarence Jackson, Cyrus Jackson and John Short, all veterans, were honored for Veteran’s Day on Nov. 12, 2012 at King George Middle School during a salute to the Armed Services and Emergency Services by the King George Ruritans and United Daughters of the Confederacy. The special quilts each man received were made by the the King George Bees, a quilting club which meets at King George Parks and Recreation Center each Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. This quilting groups gives quilts for local community groups. The presentation was made by Brenda Mitchell.

Diane Walters is instructor for the KG Bees and can be reached at (804) 224-2835.

Area charter captain pleads guilty, gets jail time, loses charter license

NORFOLK, VA – William W. Lowery IV, 44, of Tappahannock, VA, pleaded guilty today to trafficking in illegally-harvested striped bass, in violation of the Lacey Act, announced Neil H. MacBride, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, and Ignacia S. Moreno, Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division. 


Among other things, the Lacey Act makes it unlawful for any person to import, export, transport, sell, receive, acquire or purchase any fish and wildlife taken, possessed, transported or sold in violation of any law or regulation of the United States, or to attempt to do so. Under the Lacey Act, it is a “sale” of fish or wildlife for any person, for money or other consideration, to offer or provide guiding, outfitting, or other services.
Lowery was indicted on Nov. 8, 2012, by a federal grand jury on one count each of violating the Lacey Act and Destruction of Evidence. Lowery faces a maximum penalty of one year in prison, a $100,000 fine, and one-year of supervised release. He is scheduled to be sentenced on May 9, 2013.


As part of his plea agreement, Lowery has agreed to serve 30 days in jail, pay a $5,000 fine and $1,300 in restitution to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the illegally-harvested striped bass, and surrender his captain’s license for life. As part of his plea agreement, Lowery has also agreed that he will not engage in the charter fishing industry in any capacity during the term of his supervised release.


In a statement of facts filed with his plea agreement, Lowery admitted that on Jan. 15, 2010, he took a charter fishing trip into the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) to fish for striped bass, knowing that it was illegal to fish for striped bass in the EEZ. When Lowery’s boat, the Anna Lynn was approached by law enforcement, Lowery attempted to flee. When the Anna Lynn was caught, law enforcement officers observed a plastic trash barrel with 13 Striped Bass floating in the water near the Anna Lynn. The trash barrel had been thrown overboard from the Anna Lynn during the pursuit, and the striped bass contained within the trash barrel had been harvested by fishermen aboard the Anna Lynn within the EEZ.

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