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Last updateThu, 28 Jul 2016 9am

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Hammerheads defeat Grafton: improve to 4‐1

After their 254‐226 win over Grafton last week,

Hopyard is now tied at 4‐1, for second place in the...

Fawn Lake Fliers overwhelm Dahlgren Sharks

Fawn Lake Fliers overwhelm Dahlgren Sharks

The Dahlgren Sharks took a tough loss to the Fawn Lake Fliers in their 25-meter pool last week, July...

Eels dismantle Lake Wilderness Torpedos

"Eels win again, proving hard work and

consistency pays off,” were the inspirational

words s...

Building a foundation of tennis skills through King George Parks & Recreation summer camp

Building a foundation of tennis skills through King George Parks & Recreation summer camp

For 26 kids, tennis is more than just a passing sports recreational activity for intermediate/novice...

Visualize & Rize draws hundreds to celebrity sports camps

Visualize & Rize draws hundreds to celebrity sports camps

For six years, the Visualize & Rize organization has given back to the King George community.
Whe...

FootGolf at Cameron Hills to feature tourney

FootGolf at Cameron Hills to feature tourney

Now in its second year at Cameron Hills Golf Club, in King George, the sport of footGolf has ascende...

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Banner printing Comm Dental

W&L's Wild gets ready for football

Josh Wild, Washington & Lee High School's new varsity football coach, has only met with his players for a few moments since he was hired.  But he already has at least one clear goal for the season.

"My most important goal right now is from day one, we are improving," Wild said. "If we make consistent progress that will be a good start."  

"I have had about five minutes with the players so far," Wild said.  "Our first practice is July 28th and then we will see what we have got.  But every position will be open to competition."

The Eagles open the season on Aug. 25 at King George.  Wild is planning to tailor his offense and defense to the talent he has available.  "I am a former running back and I love running the football," Wild said.   But it is also exciting and fun to throw the ball all over."

"We will just have to see what our talent allows us to do," Wild said.  "In the meantime, we are going to tell our kids every day to make sure they are doing the little things right.  That's what makes a difference.."

Wild is making steady progress .  He has hired a number of new assistant coaches, Spencer Sadler, Ed Futch, Will Owens and a returning former W&L assistant, Jacob Spears.  "They are going to be a vital part of what we are doing," Wild said.

The new coach and he wife, Beth, have moved to Montross in the past few weeks.
They have a 14-month-old son, Landon.  Beth is a physical fitness expert and a former soccer player.

Wild was hired after a lengthy and determined multi-state search.  Previously he was the offensive coordinator at Southern Lee High School in Sanford, NC.  This will be Wild's first head coaching opportunity.

"Coach Wild has been hard at work doing all the right things," said W&L Athletic Director Malcolm Lewis.  "His planning is long term and he is quickly building relationships with players, colleagues and the community in general."

"What I like about him is that he is a character guy," Lewis said.  "I firmly believe that he is going to make his players into better citizens and we often forget that that is our main mission."

Wild, who played running back and linebacker in high school while growing up near Auburn , NY, has a bachelor's degree in physical education from SUNY in New Work and a master's degree from West Virginia University.  

Wild has been offensive coordinator for the Southern Lee Cavaliers in Lee County, NC for the past two years. He also has previously served as an offensive coordinator for Stafford High School in Virginia.  Wild is a physical education teacher who has served as a strength coach and also has coached wrestling and lacrosse.

W&L getting ready for cross country

Washington & Lee High School in Montross, noted for the top flight long distance runners it has produced in

recent years, is getting ready for the 2016­17 cross country season.

"Boys and girls cross country will start Aug. 1 at W&L High School," said Cole Vanover, the boys cross country

coach. "All those interested will meet near the W&L softball field next Monday."

Vanover said there will be an information meeting at 5:30 p.m. for parents, then a 6 p.m. meeting with all

interested athletes. Those runners wishing to participate are asked to bring water, running shoes, a towel, a

dry shirt and copies of any recent medical physicals.

"Last year was a huge change for our program, moving from 1A to 2A. We found success individually having

two athletes earn all state honors," said Vanover. "We are still Washington & Lee, and the expectations are

high for our runners. We will continue to try to develop the best student athletes."

Richard Leggitt

Oak Grove Recreation Center: Mecca for summer sports and academic camps

For Chase and Daphne Davidson recreation and

academics are the perfect remedy for the doldrums

associated with the lazy swelter days of summer.

Married for nine years, the couple met as health &

physical education students at Radford University.

Since then, the Davidsons have focused their lives

around their three children, the peaceful spiritual

comforts of Oak Grove Baptist Church, and their beloved

community of Westmoreland County.

More importantly, as camp directors, the Davidsons

have taken the venue of Oak Grove Baptist Church’s

Family Life Center to a new level, broadening its

summer programs into a menagerie of sports,

academics and personal enrichments programs for

children. Whether its science, volleyball, baseball,

drama, cooking, basketball, or general recreational

activities, the camps have something to offer everyone.

“If you think about the average person, its not just

the athlete or someone fixated on reading that the

camps attract, we have a myriad of things they enjoy

doing,” Daphne said during a recent baseball camp, at

Oak Grove Baptist Church’s Dyer Pavilion. “We want to

make sure every person has an outlet to express

themselves.”

Registration for individual camps begins in April,

and can last until the final camp, on August 15.

The purpose of creating a format that includes

culture, art, academics and athletics is to provide each

kids a chance to benefit from the well‐rounded

programs associated with the camp.

There has never been a dull moment in the camp for 10‐

year old Kya Bushrod. “I like the part of art class where

I got to make paper maché bowls,” Bushrod said. “You

blow up a balloon, then put paper over it, using glue,

and once you pop it—it becomes a bowl.”

Since the opening of the recreation center, and the

summer programs associated with it, there has never

been a shortage of volunteers. Throughout the

community, teachers, scientist, and ministers have

eagerly given their support as teachers each week.

Oak Grove Baptist Church pastor Randall Snipes is

thrilled to see the growth of the summer programs

flourish each year. “We feel that God has led us to this in

a way to help lean into the community, and provide a

place for people to recreate, as well as a ministry to

other ministries,” Snipes said.

Whether its discovering the physics associated with

liquid nitrogen from NSWC engineer Daniel Wallace, or

learning the proper soccer footwork/positioning skills,

kids both small and tall leave the camp fulfilled with the

greater understanding their physical and mental

capabilities.

Colonial Beach Elementary School art teacher

Kimberly Fischer has also found a sense of personal

enrichment, while donating her time to the program.

“After the church helped us out with the fire we had

several years ago, I felt a need to give back to the

community—I absolutely love it,” Fischer said.

Each program averages 65‐75 kids a week. A staff of

adult volunteers, while under the direction of the

Davidsons supervises all summer camp activities.

“The camps was kind of a vision that just showed up,

and we ran with it,” Chase said. “If we could do this year

round, this is what we would do.”

For calendar information on Oak Grove Baptist

Church summer camps, go online to

www.ogbcfamily.org.

Leonard Banks

Sports editor

Oak Grove Baptist Church volleyball camp

Oak Grove Baptist Church, fresh off of soccer and

science camp, finished its third successful camp of

the summer; this time it was volleyball. Throughout

the week, the four major skills of volleyball were

focused on during station work. These skills were

serving, passing, setting, and attacking. Skills, along

with 6 versus 6 game‐play, rounded out each day. A

total of 42 kids came out to the Oak Grove Baptist

Family Life Center to take part in volleyball camp.

The past two years, we have held volleyball camp

outside. With the new addition of the Family Life

Center, we were able to host the entire camp

inside. I definitely felt like volleyball camp went

smoother this year than in years past. Being able to

be inside and on a real court was very beneficial and

the improvement in skills throughout the week

showed just that. I was excited, kids stayed focused

and really improved in all aspects of the game.

Many of these kids are going to make solid

volleyball players in a few years.

When Davidson is not up to his hands in volunteer

church recreational activities, his life takes a sudden

shift as the Colonial Beach High School head

volleyball coach. Recently, he and a team of players

spent five days, and four nights at the annual

Liberty University Volleyball Camp, in Lynchburg,

VA.

The experience had a profound effect on Davidson

and his team of Drifter players. During their stay, in

a crowded field of 50 plus teams, they played 10‐14

games, while constantly perfecting their court skills.

“Basically, you wake up, eat, play volleyball, and got

to bed,” Davidson said. “It’s a great camp, and this

is the second year in a row that we’ve attended the

camp. The girls leave the camp so much better, and

the best part is that we get go much volleyball in

long before we start practice. By the time August

arrives, we feel live we are ready.”

Last season, the Drifters volleyball program finished

with the best record (12‐11) in recent school

history. The double‐digit finish has proven to be the

perfect incentive to attend more Liberty University

volleyball camps.

Chase Davidson

Hammerheads defeat Grafton: improve to 4‐1

After their 254‐226 win over Grafton last week,

Hopyard is now tied at 4‐1, for second place in the

RSL National Division.

The meet featured three triple Hammerhead

winners in the form of Abby Elia, Grace

Brancheau, and Lindsay Knoke. Poise, confidence,

and team spirit were the three key ingredients for

the Hammerhead away‐meet victory.

"Last night we traveled to Grafton and showed how

much we have grown as a team,” Hammerhead head

coach Connor Muncie said. “I was very impressed

with our demeanor as a group and composure in the

face of adversity. We have our last dual meet of the

year against the Eels Monday and are really looking

forward to ending the season with a bang!”

Hammerhead triple winners include: Abby Elia: girls

13­14 50­meter freestyle, 32.75, girls 13­14 50­meter

butterfly, 38.60, girls 13­14 50­meter backstroke,

38.72; Grace Brancheau: Girls 11­12 50­meter

butterfly, 43.31, girls 11­12 50­meter backstroke,

43.43, girls 12 and under 100­meter IM, 1:32.93;

Lindsay Knoke: Girls 15­18 50­meter freestyle 32.16,

girls 15­18 50­meter butterfly, 34.78, girls 13­18

100­meter IM, 1:21.09.

Hammerhead double winners include: Hudson

Gamble: boys 11‐12 50‐meter breaststroke, 54.41,

boys 11‐12 50‐meter butterfly, 48.53; Natalie Knoke:

girls 11‐12 50‐meter freestyle, 35.88, girls 11‐12 50‐

meter breaststroke, 47.62; Cissanie Krohe: girls 8 &

under 25‐meter butterfly, 29.75, girls 8 & under 25‐

meter breaststroke, 34.12; Rebecca Miller: girls 9‐10

25‐meter backstroke, 22.53, girls 9‐10 25‐meter

breaststroke, 23.09; Katelyn Spuchesi Girls 9‐10 25‐

meter freestyle 17.13, girls 9‐10 25‐meter butterfly

22.50.

Leonard Banks

Sports editor

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