Sun04202014

Last updateTue, 04 Nov 2014 9pm

    2Q14-MetroCast VIP-HBO 500x125

Project Faith loses second round in court

Clark Leming, attorney for Project Faith, Inc., lost a second round in court last week on April 9 in...

In case you missed it

In case you missed it

The lunar eclipse, the first of four consecutive lunar eclipses, began around 1 a.m. and lasted well...

Safety on the minds of students

Safety on the minds of students

Several citizens, teachers and school staff turned out on Tuesday to speak at the Town Council meeti...

Town Council considers a .25 cent increase in real estate taxes

During a long budget work session held on April 15 the council wrapped up discussions after almost f...

W&L's Andrea Roane granted a continuance on DWI charges

The principal of Washington & Lee High School has requested and received a continuance of her We...

Montross and Westmoreland County Museum kickoff Student Art Walk this weekend

Montross and Westmoreland County Museum kickoff Student Art Walk this weekend

April 12 to May 10

The Westmoreland County Museum will be hosting a local student art walk from April...


 

 eyecareofva201403-web

chesapeakeauction-web

King George

SETTING

Healthy kids

Wednesday, 16 April 2014
Healthy kids

Kids from throughout the King George community were excited to participate in the Healthy Kid’s Day Fun 1-Mile Run at the YMCA on April 12.

Readmore

Colonial Beach

SETTING

Safety on the minds of students

Wednesday, 16 April 2014
Safety on the minds of students

Several citizens, teachers and school staff turned out on Tuesday to speak at the Town Council meeting on April 10 to compel the council to approve funding for the high school repairs.

Readmore

Westmoreland

SETTING

W&L's Andrea Roane granted a continuance on DWI charges

Wednesday, 16 April 2014

The principal of Washington & Lee High School has requested and received a continuance of her Westmoreland County General District Court appearance on charges of drunk driving and use of a handhel...

Readmore

Sports

SETTING

Drifters overpower W&L Eagles

Wednesday, 16 April 2014
Drifters overpower W&L Eagles

On Thursday, the Drifters won the first round of the annual Northern Neck war between the Beach and Washington & Lee, 17-0. Nick Graves went 3-3, with a grand-slam homer, a double, and a single th...

Readmore

Area Deaths

SETTING

Eunice V. Johnson

Friday, 04 April 2014

Eunice V. Johnson, of Alexandria VA, died on Friday, March 21, 2014 in Alexandria.

Readmore

Columnists

SETTING

Antiques Considered - April 16, 2014

Wednesday, 16 April 2014
Antiques Considered - April 16, 2014

This Victorian chandelier hangs in an old Northern Neck home.  The owner writes that it is not original to the house, but was an estate sale acquisition many years ago for $100.  The glass i...

Readmore

Office-for-rent Jrnl Bldg 20130925

Marine Police target oyster poachers

Increased enforcement and toughened penalties aim to protect booming oyster stocks from unscrupulous thieves

Newport News — This year Virginia Marine Police will combat oyster theft by air, land and sea in an intensive effort to crush what has become an epidemic of poaching. The public oyster season is now open.


“We mean business. We will vigorously pursue anyone who violates the oyster regulations, and we will prosecute them to the fullest extent of the law,” said Virginia Marine Police Chief Rick Lauderman.

“Stealing oysters from the public oyster grounds, private leased grounds or from oyster sanctuaries, in particular, will not be tolerated. Oyster poaching in Virginia will stop.”

A number of Marine Police Officers have been dedicated to search for oyster violations as their top priorities. An airplane will prowl the skies, patrolling for suspicious activity on both public and privately leased oyster grounds. Other techniques and equipment will be used, as well.

And the Virginia Marine Resources Commission comes armed to this fight with a renewed commitment to revoking violators’ commercial fishing licenses and with a new tool: Revocation of all saltwater fishing privileges, as allowed by a new state law that went into effect on July 1. The Marine Police is the Commission’s law enforcement division.

In fact, the Commission recently adopted new sanction guidelines that call for the revocation of commercial fishing licenses for even a single egregious offense. This is a tougher standard from prior guidelines, which called for a license suspension hearing on a third court conviction of fishery regulations within a calendar year.

Just last week, on Sept. 24, the Commission voted unanimously to revoke the fishing licenses of five commercial oyster harvesters who had pleaded guilty in criminal court to repeatedly harvesting more than their daily allowable bushel limits of oysters. Two of those five watermen saw their licenses revoked for a year, followed by a year of probation, and three were revoked for two years, which is the maximum allowed under current state law.

“Those who violate our oyster laws will face arrest, as well as the revocation of both their licenses and their right to fish in tidal waters,” said VMRC Commissioner Jack Travelstead. “They could be banned from any type of commercial fishing activity, even packing fish someone else caught. They’ll need another line of work for awhile. We anticipate a good oyster season this year, and law-abiding watermen should not have to suffer because of thieves.”

“Oysters are ecologically and economically important, and the Commission is committed to preserving a resurgent oyster stock and to protecting a substantial investment in oyster replenishment,” Travelstead said.

A single adult oyster can purge up to 50 gallons of water a day, and help clean the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. Oyster reefs provide important forage and refuge habitat for invertebrates, as well as juvenile crabs and finfish species.
Over the past decade, the oyster harvest in Virginia has increased ten-fold, from 23,000 bushels in 2001, to an estimated 250,000 bushels in 2012. In that time, the dockside value of the oyster harvest increased from $575,000 to more than $8.26 million. The harvest is projected to jump to 320,000 bushels this year, which would make it the largest oyster harvest in Virginia since 1987.

“Oyster stocks are on the rise. We have invested a lot of time, effort and money into making that happen,” said Travelstead. “More oysters in the water may tempt some unscrupulous watermen. If so, this is a warning. We will not allow these stocks to be plundered.”

The Marine Resources Commission spent $2 million on oyster replenishment this summer, thanks to a historic level of funding from Gov. Bob McDonnell and the General Assembly.

Roughly 1 million bushels of oyster shells were planted on public oyster beds, which was an estimated 1 billion individual empty oyster shells, enough to fill approximately 4,000 dump trucks.

Every $1 spent by the state to plant oyster shells yields $7 in economic benefits in the form of larger harvests and increased jobs for oyster shuckers and oyster packing houses, when the oyster larvae that attach to the shells grow to market size in three years.

 

John Bull
VMRC

Print Shop pens 2013 sml

201404chamberlink

 

201403source

Contact Us

The Journal Press, Inc. P. O. Box 409, 10250 Kings Hwy. King George, VA 22485

EditorialAdvertisingOffice
Ruth Herrink, Publisher
540-469-4144
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Carla Gutridge
540-709-7061
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Leonard Banks, Production
540-469-4196
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Leonard Banks, Sports editor
540-469-4196
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Steve Detwiler
540-709-7288
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Drue Murray
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Phyllis Cook
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Charlene Franks
540-709-7075
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Cindy Ailey
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Linda Farneth,
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Elizabeth Foreman,
540-709-7076
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Charlene Franks, Accounts
540-709-7075
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Richard Leggitt
540-993-7460
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Lori Deem
540-709-7495
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Bonnie Gouvisis
540-775-2024
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Lori Deem, Community Events
540-709-7495
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Advertising Information
540-775-2024
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Jessica Herrink
540-469-4031
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Journal Print Shop

Contact Steve Detwiler

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

540-709-7288 • 540-775-2024

Quikey

Bulletline

Holiday Cards and Cards for all Occasions

Balloon House